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Lloyd W. Young

(1908-1994)
Lloyd W. Young

Stories from the life of Lloyd Young

A couple stories that I wish to relate, that Grandpa Lloyd Young shared with me when my wife Laurel and I went to visit. I recorded many of the stories, but cannot locate this story if I did indeed record it. First an amazing note regarding the various recordings that I did obtain.

On various occasions, I would travel with my new, little family (Ashton being our only child at that time; his little voice is what you hear in the background of the recordings) to Idaho to visit with the whole purpose to obtain recordings. That was a cherished time for me.

Those recording sat in the top of my dresser for years. I always intended on typing them, but the speed at which I type and my 11 years of schooling just did not permit such an accomplishment. On December 22, 2004, while our family was visiting family in Utah we got a phone call from our bishop informing us that our house was burning down. Many important things from our lives went up in smoke.

However, there were several things that miraculously survived. The chest of drawers where my before mentioned tapes had been stored had been charred completely on the outside. The chest of drawers had remained standing against the wall, being supported only by the two to three feet of subflooring that remained right under them. All the rest of the floor was gone such that you could see down into the garage under our bedroom. The individuals that were trying salvage what they could had to cautiously edge their way into a position literally pry the fronts off of the chest of drawer and pull the rest of the drawer out and dump the contents out a window. The cases to the cassettes were warped, and I felt that the tapes might be damaged as well. Such things generally were just pitched into the garbage, but I chose to keep these items and did so for several years.

Later I had a discussion with my cousin Russell McMullin about the tapes and he said he might be able to pull the information off of them. I sent them to him and he was able to convert them to a digital copy that he now has posted on his family's web site. What a miracle. A similar event happened to journals that I had been keeping for all of my children, my wife's journal and her patriarchal blessing. All were amazing miracles when you consider all the other circumstances and the other things we did lose.

Story 1 - Grandpa and his dad's champion pulling horses

Grandpa related a time when he was young (age I don't remember) and had been given an assignment by his father to go out and hitch up a team of horses and pull a heavy sleigh load of something (I believe he said it was logs) to town.

He drove the horses to a point where he had to drag the sleigh over the dry railroad tracks with the runners of the sleigh. The drag on the sleigh cause one of the single trees to break which left his team and the sleigh stuck on the tracks. Grandpa said that he jumped off of the sleigh and ran to the tack store that was a close distance from where he was. He entered the premise, explained his circumstance and asked if he could obtain a single tree to get his team and sleigh off of the tracks and then he would return to the store and take care of the payment. The owner gave him the needed single tree and he quickly returned to the team and replaced the single tree. He then described how he brought the team up to perfect tension on the sleigh and at his signal the perfectly trained team lunged in synchrony and pulled the very heavy load immediately off of the track to safety.

Grampa discussed that this team was his father's famous pulling team that were Idaho State Pulling Champions. If I recall, he described them as white or grey white. (Wish I could find a painting of a pair of white horses pulling a sleigh weighed down with logs. It would be a most amazing picture to me).

Anyway, back to the story. He stopped and tied up the team to take care of what he owed the owner of the store. When he went to the counter, the owner said that he owed nothing. Grandpa did not understand. The owner then pointed to a gentleman standing near by and said that he was the salesman for the company that made the single tree and that he had bet the owner of the store that the horses would never be able to pull the sleigh off of the dry tracks and that if he did, he would pay for the single tree.

Story 2 - John R. Young's short handled hoe

Grandpa also spoke of his memory as of boy of seeing his grandfather John R Young when he would come to visit. One of his memories was that of a short handled hoe that was kept in a certain place that was for Grandpa to use when he would come to visit. He said he remembers some mornings waking up to the sound of a hoe chopping into the soil. He would look out and see grandpa, who only had one arm due to an accident, going up and down the rows of bean and such with that short hoe.